Team Stellar Balloon Flights

Team Stellar Balloons in Croatia

Here is a post straight from the Team Stellar news pages. I will have a lot more detail in a few posts soon. It was an incredible trip with really hard parameters. Jason (12) and myself went with Team Stellar’s CTO – Tim Blaxland. You can read directly this short post from Team Stellar’s website about the success and other news at:

http://www.teamstellar.org/

Yes, we launched from the heart of Zagreb! I have never launched a balloon from the middle of a city before, nor in the harsh conditions we encountered. Success was pretty much guaranteed with our reliance on well-known science for the planning.

Stellar News

Balloon Stellar Stratosphere Update

During the last week, Team Stellar launched  two science balloons into the stratosphere, about 30 km above the Earth’s surface, to collect data for the purposes of diverse student-designed experiments of the competition participants.

We brought to Croatia three team members from Australia to help us with the launch and the recovery of the balloons. Robert Brand and his son Jason hold the world record with the perfect score of 16/16 successful launches, and recoveries. Their score is even better now, with two new successes. Tim Blaxland also came to help in organizing the launches.

The first balloon was launched on April 21. It was cloudy and it was raining, we were waiting for hours for a suitable moment to launch. After a few hours, we decided to go. The balloon achieved the maximum altitude was 109,500 ft (over 33 km). The recovery was very difficult, because the payload finished its fall on the top of a really high tree. After a lot of trouble, our guys somehow managed to take it down from the tree.

The second launch was done in somewhat better conditions. It was less cloudy and no rain. We launched the second group of student experiments. We also had an experiment with full HD, 1080p Wireless (WLAN) live stream from the stratosphere. The experiment was successful, and you could watch live stream on our web page. The Balloon reached the altitude of 30,862 m.

The recovery of the second balloon was very easy. The payload fell right in front of our chase team, on the flat land.

We are now returning the experiments to the teams, so that the students can see what their experiments have measured and what kind of data were collected in the stratosphere.

 

Pico Balloon Update

Andy Balloon altitude over AustraliaPico Balloon Departs Australia

Andy’s Pico Balloon Update: It has now passed over the bottom of Fraser Island in SE Queensland and out to sea.

Next stop may be South America in a week’s time. We do not expect to hear from the balloon until then, but it may pass over New Zealand or Tonga.

At right is the altitude details from the spacenear.us website. The balloon took about 2 hours to get to just over 8km altitude and because it is a foil balloon and cannot expand, it then sits at that altitude day and night. You can see a small dip as the sun sets until it warms up again the next day. It then rises as the balloon skin expands in the heat. Air pressure will also cause the balloon to rise or fall as will vertical air currents.

The balloon will change APRS frequencies as it crosses different longitudes but the RTTY frequencies stay standard across the world.

Below is the last track of the balloon crossing the coast today.

Andy says that the payload weighs 13 grams or less than half an ounce and consists of:

  • APRS and RTTY transmitters (10mW)
  • A GPS receiver
  • rechargeable batteries
  • solar panel
  • Insulation

The gas is helium and the metal foil balloon should not deteriorate much in a week. The gas also does not leak out very much from a foil balloon compared to a latex or other non-metal balloon.

Note that because the balloon is so light, it is classified as a small balloon and does not need to involve CASA to be able to fly such balloons.

Andy Balloon departing Australia

Our New Online Shop Opening Soon

Totex 100 gram Red BalloonGreat News – Our Shop is Opening Soon

We will be setting up an online shop and selling weather balloons, balloon equipment, radio systems and much more for those interested in flying High altitude weather balloons and much more. I will also be selling general comms equipment from time to time and HAM radio equipment to verified HAM radio operators. Keep watching!

Note that we are located in Australia and the shop is for the convenience of Australians who may not be able to wait for a delivery from overseas. We will not be the cheapest, but we will be the best.

Right now I have 44 x 100 gram Totex Red Balloons ($20 each), some 350 gram weather balloons ($50 each) and 2 x 3kg weather balloons. These 3Kg balloons are well over their expiry date (maybe about 3 years old – good for displays ($150 each). If you want any of these you will need to contact me on 0448 881 101.

I will calculate postage by Australia post depending on what you order. eg 500 gram express post bag can handle 4 X 100 gram balloons + bubble wrap and costs $15. The same to New Zealand will be $20 postage; to the US $25 postage and to anywhere else $30 postage.

Balloon specs here: http://www.esands.com/pdf/Meteorology/Totex_TA_Balloons_070213_web.pdf for Totex

We will be supplying NEW Totex weather balloons, although we may have the odd balloon from another supplier for time to time. I can also organise large orders if needed.

Totex 100 gram Red Weather Balloon Box

Andy’s Pico Flight Progress

Balloon Headed North

Andy’s Pico Flight progress has been as predicted. It is heading very much north from Melbourne in an unusual jet stream current. It is averaging about 8,000m (8Km – 5 miles) altitude and headed north at an average speed of 80kph (50mph). It recently passed over where Jason and I launch our balloons. It was a little west of Rankin Springs!

With a little luck, the current winds will take the balloon to sea near Cairns in far north Queensland (Australia). Below is the current track at time of publication:

Andy flight

Below is a snapshot of the jet stream that has allowed the flight to head north rather than the regular west to east path:

Jet Stream 2014-06-09

See the wind markers pointing straight up from Melbourne in the SE of Australia? Below is a more normal flow in 3 days time. The wind is headed west to east:

Jet Stream 2014-06-12

Andy has been very careful to watch the forecast and launch for the unusual jet stream wind direction.

Note that HAM radio tracking is listed in the preceding post. Tracking sites on the Internet are listed.

Track a Pico Balloon flight

Pico Flight prediction

Pico Flight prediction

Scheduled Pico Balloon Flight Monday 9th June 2014

My friend Andy will be sending a Balloon aloft from his home town of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia this Monday and it is headed initially north then east over the Pacific Ocean. I expect that it is headed to New Zealand and beyond.

Andy says:

Hi,

FYI, PS-9 PICO balloon release is planned for Monday morning

10mW transmit power, 

THOR16 with RTTY on 434.500Mhz

APRS on 2m band.

APRS call sign: VK3YT-11

Tracking as PS on spacenear.us

Will be in #picospace IRC channel on freenode.net

 http://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=picospace

 Andy

Note that the flight needs to head North or it will end up too low by the time it reaches New Zealand! Andy is looking at Jet Stream predictions to ensure that it heads north before it begins its easterly track. The APRS frequencies are different in each country and Andy’s transmitter is able to change frequencies by using GPS co-ordinates to know where it is. I believe that this is also using a small solar panel to keep it active. South America, here he comes!

Also the spacenear.us website will probably only list his flight an hour or so before departure.

You can watch the APRS tracking at http://aprs.fi  and use the call sign VK2YT-11 Isn’t Amateur Radio (HAM radio) wonderful?

He made it to New Zealand twice now, so South America is next!

Pico Flight prediction

Pico Flight prediction

What is a Pico Balloon?

Andy Pico Balloon to New ZealandMaking a Pico Balloon

by Robert Brand

There is not much in making a pico balloon – literally. My friend Andy has been making and flying pico balloons for a while now. These are basically strong foil party balloons that you can buy prefilled from a party shop. In fact, I believe that Andy keeps a few at home, ready to launch. When he sees the winds are right he adds the tiny GPS receiver, computer, APRS 10mW transmitter, Battery and antenna. These are secured to the balloon with little more than fishing line. The payload only weighs 13 grans – that is less than half an ounce.

In Australia, there are 4 classes of untethered or FREE balloons:

“Small, Light, Medium and Heavy balloons”

CASR Part 101E states:

A small balloon means a free balloon that can carry no more than 50 grams of payload.

So Andy’s balloon is classified as a “Small” balloon.

Provided that he does not launch within 6 nautical miles of an airport ( 11.112km), a single small balloon does not need CASA approval. CASA are the Australian Civil Aviation Authority and their job is to police the CASR (Civil Aviation Safety Regulations). Up to 100 small balloons may be released at the same time if far enough away from n airport or air field without needing CASA approval. If more are to released, the number and distance from the field must be considered as it defines what approval CASA need to give.

Other countries mostly have the same regulations, but you must check before releasing any balloon.

This information was correct at the time of publication, but readers are reminded to check for any changes in the regulations before releasing any balloon.

As for the payload, Andy chose to use th HAM Radio APRS system to track his balloons as HAM radio operators (Amateur Radio Operators) have set up a global network of tracking systems. Andy has his amateur radio license and is capable of making very small electronic components. He has chosen a small lithium battery and thin wires for the antenna. Each 5.5 minutes, the transmitter pulses a 10mW APRS signal from the payload and it can simply be tracked on the internet by anyone.

In the picture above, look carefully at the little black dot near the base of the clouds and a little to the left of the balloon. That is the 13 gram payload. Depending on air pressure, the balloon will sit in the lower jet stream between 6,500m to 8,500m altitude.

My friend Andy (VK3YT) is a master of minaturisation. Pico by definition means “one trillionth” – The work is used to emphasis the tin size of the payload – sounds better than a “small balloon”! He sent that picture to show the release of a recent flight! I hope to have a great announcement for you all soon about another Pico flight!

Just in case you have not read the previous articles. A balloon this size made from Melbourne to Sydney and on to New Zealand, crossing the Tasman Sea in just over 24 hours.

 

New Zealand gives Andy a Big Tick

New Zealand encounterBig Tick for NZ APRS and TransTasman Success

by Robert Brand

The New Zealand encounter with Andy’s (VK3YT) Pico Balloon (launched from Melbourne) has now ended. The low power from the Balloon payload will probably not be heard of again unless the Jet Stream turns the balloon around for another pass. It is unlikely to return, but there are some big changes in the Jet stream from time to time.Current predictions say it will head east and out into open water until the batteries fail.

It was fortunate that the balloon made it to New Zealand before the Jet Stream winds changed direction. The flight stayed over New Zealand for most of the day giving those interested in tracking it the opportunity to see where it was headed.

The balloon has been sitting at around 8,500m for most of the time in NZ. One APRS amateur radio station that was the first to receive Andy’s signals was also the last to track the balloon as it left New Zealand The APRS iGate received out packets and sent them to the Internet . Today I spoke with the owner of the iGate and there were a few interesting things that I should mention.

Warren Harris (ZL2AJ)  lives near Hastings in New Zealand and his antenna and receiver are at the top of a 720m hill. It is relayed down the hill by another radio link and into his iGate and on to the Internet. His radio received most of the packets from the balloon and only when the balloon was close to some other iGate receivers did they get the traffic.  I spoke with Warren about the balloon flight and he said it created a lot of “buzz” on the chat and email groups. Warren will write a story on this for NZ. Andy said that he will send a picture of the balloon to him for publications

Another interesting fact was that Warren’s iGate was broken yesterday with a faulty power supply. He fixed it last night without knowing that Andy’s balloon was on the way. It was only operational for a few hours before Andy’s balloon came over.

Andy (and I) want to thank all those in NZ that have APRS iGates and digipeaters. It is a great service for new endeavours. A special thanks to Warren whose iGate seems to outperform all others when it comes to ballooning.

TransTasman Balloon Breaks Records

Andy NZ TrackTransTasman Balloon Heads to the North Island

The record breaking balloon flight launched by my friend and colleague  Andy VK2YT continues to break records. It was thought that it would pass over the south island and out to sea, but it has changed course and headed north and is now crossing the stretch of water between the north and south island and will remain in range of HAM radio APRS trackers for many hours to come.

Launched from Melbourne, Australia on Sunday, it left the Australian coast just after midnight on Monday Morning and took just over 24 hours to reach New Zealand

A long range PICO balloon flight is under way. Predicted path is Melbourne – Sydney – NZ

Payload is an ultra-light APRS beacon transmitting 10mW on 144.575Mhz (NZ APRS).

Callsign is VK3YT-11

APRS tracking at
http://aprs.fi/#!call=a%2FVK3YT-11&timerange=86400&tail=86400

Tracking with prediction at
http://spacenear.us/tracker/?filter=VK3YT-11

Updates will be posted at http://picospace.net

Andy NZ Track

Australia to New Zealand Balloon Success

Andy New ZealandTrans Tasman Balloon Success

Congratulations to Andy, VK3YT in getting his Pico Balloon from Melbourne Australia to New Zealand. The balloon crossed land in New Zealand at 1600 UTC (GMT)  17th March 2014.

The flight last tracked offshore from Sydney more than a day ago and the tiny balloon has been transmitting its signal over the ocean until it changed frequencies at 160 degrees longitude to the New Zealand APRS tracking system.

NZ Amateur radio station Zl2AJ-5 was the first to hear the tiny 10mW transmitter as it neared the coast. The balloon will likely pass over the country within an hour and sone after the transmitter will fail with the battery losing power.
————————————————

A long range PICO balloon flight is under way. Predicted path is Melbourne – Sydney – NZ

Payload is an ultra-light APRS beacon transmitting 10mW on 144.575Mhz.

Callsign is VK3YT-11

APRS tracking at
http://aprs.fi/#!call=a%2FVK3YT-11&timerange=86400&tail=86400

Tracking with prediction at
http://spacenear.us/tracker/?filter=VK3YT-11

Updates will be posted at http://picospace.net

Andy NZ

 

Andy’s Long Distance HAB Attempt

Angy Pico Flight to NZAustralia to New Zealand HAB Attempt

Last night I got word that my good friend Andy from Melbourne was attempting a long distance Trans Tasman Balloon attempt. I’m not sure if it qualifies as a High Altitude Balloon flight as it just gets to about 7km altitude and not the typical 20km to 30km. It is classified as a small balloon and does not require CASA permission to fly. Simply it is a foil balloon that cannot expand and a very light payload. In this case the tracking payload is a single AAA battery and a 10mW tracker. The payload weights only 13 grams. The balloon is set to float at about 7,000m and when Andy launched the balloon it was predicted to fly from Melbourne to Sydney and on to New Zealand.

Andy’s email said:

FYI, A long range PICO balloon flight is under way. Predicted path is Melbourne – Sydney – New Zealand.
Currently over Victoria Alpine National Park at 7000m, doing 125km/h.

Payload is an ultra-light APRS beacon transmitting 10mW on 145.175Mhz.   Callsign is VK3YT-11

APRS tracking at
http://aprs.fi/#!call=a%2FVK3YT-11&timerange=86400&tail=86400

Tracking with prediction at
http://spacenear.us/tracker/?filter=VK3YT-11

Updates will be posted at http://picospace.net

 Expected to reach Sydney tonight, then it will be out to sea.
If the balloon survives tomorrow it might be within range of New Zealand APRS stations around 12:00 UTC 17/3

TX frequency will switch to NZ APRS frequency 144.575Mhz once 160.0 longitude is crossed.

Regards, Andy

Well around Midnight last night the little balloon tracked right over Sydney and if I had binoculars and it was daylight I could have seen it!  It was last tracked about 30km off Sydney headed to New Zealand. We are waiting to see if it arrives in New Zealand in a few hours.

 

Andy flight to NZ.

Rossby Waves, Hadley Cells and the Jetstream

Rossby Waves, Hadley Cells and Distorted Jet Stream

Seems that Global Warming has a lot to do with the difficulties we are experiencing with our weather. The Jet Stream is pretty neat without Global Warming and very predictable and so is the weather. Recently, the northern hemisphere experienced massive cool events and extremely cold weather. Why?

So what does the Jet Stream do normally?

The circulating air patterns create convection currents in four global locations—each current is called a Hadley cell. The pattern of air movement is toward the Earth (pro-grade) at higher latitudes (in the subtropics) and backward (up from the Earth) at lower latitudes (near the equator). The movement occurs near the Earth’s surface—within 6.2-9.3 mi. (10-15 km.). Its span across latitudinal markers remains within thirty degrees north or south of the equator. In this way, a Hadley cell moves heat from the equatorial region to regions within 30 degrees of latitude in either direction. Moisture is moved along with the heat.

Hadley Cells

Hadley Circulation provides westward wind flow at the Earth’s surface (Trade Winds) and eastward jet streams at higher altitudes. The circulating air patterns create convection currents in four global locations—each current is called a Hadley cell.

HadleyCirculation

In a Hadley cell, the air rises to the atmospheric tropopause, which is the region at the top border of the troposphere and thus the bottom border of the stratosphere. The troposphere is the lowest atmospheric region and is where all weather takes place. At the equator, it reaches up to 11 mi. (18 km.) from the earth’s surface.

The next atmospheric layer is the stratosphere, extending to 31 mi. (50 km.) from the Earth’s surface. This characteristic air circulation results from the Sun’s rays heating the air at the level of the equator. Solar heating is strongest at the equator and weakest at the north and south poles, due to the direction of the Sun’s rays, and therefore currents of atmospheric circulation due to solar heating are more prominent at the equator.

Hadley Circulation was first described by George Hadley (1685-1768) to explain the science behind the trade winds. It was to replace a flawed model that had been presented by Edmond Halley (1656-1742). George Hadley was an early 18th century meteorologist by hobby and lawyer by trade.

In fact, Hadley’s theory was imperfect as well. It was corrected by American meteorologist William Ferrel (1817-91) at the end of the 19th century, but by this time Hadley’s name had stuck. The Hadley Circulation is traditionally defined as resting on the equator; in fact it rests on the “thermal equator,” or the Sun’s zenith.

Rossby Waves

Rossby Waves - Jet sStreamWarming Arctic May Be Causing Jet Stream To Lose Its Way. Echoing trends since roughly 2010-2011, NPR reports on how changes in far northern latitudes may be showing up in the skies floating above your house; here’s an excerpt: “…The temperature difference between the Arctic and lower latitudes is one of the main sources of fuel for the jet stream; it’s what drives the winds. And because the Arctic is warming so fast, that temperature difference is getting smaller, and so the fuel for the jet stream is getting weaker,” Francis says. “When it gets into this pattern, those big waves tend to stay in the same place for some time. The pattern we’ve seen in December and January has been one of these very wavy patterns...”

Image credit above: “The jet stream that circles Earth’s north pole travels west to east. But when the jet stream interacts with a Rossby wave, as shown here, the winds can wander far north and south, bringing frigid air to normally mild southern states.” NASA/GSFC.

Researching Balloon Launches in a New Country

Croatia LandminesBalloon Launches in a New Country – How To…

In the next few weeks, Jason and I will head to Croatia to oversee the balloon project of Team Stellar. So far we have been working with the team from afar and good communications are essential. We have email, Skype, Dropbox and more, so communications are good. We have been working with time issues to make sure everything happens in a timely fashion – there is a country wide student competition at stake. The students and their mentors are working hard so everything has to go well.

Our biggest problems are ones that we do not have here in Australia. We are used to having a very big launch and recovery area in Australia with few trees and little chance of water. It has good tracking and good mobile data coverage.

Croatia? Well there are plenty of unknowns for both me and the rest of the team in Croatia. The requirements are to keep the balloon in Croatia. This is hard. It is a small country with an unusual shape. The useful West to East range is only about 300km and it is pretty tight too.

That is Croatia in the map top right. So what are all the red bits? Stuff that we have to avoid! Things that we are not used to in Australia. They are land mines. We cannot afford to have our payloads drop anywhere near them. These are left over from the wars in the area from 1991 to 1995. These mines are still very new and deadly.

So what else we will have to contend with? Snow, mountains, poor Internet coverage, pine forests, unknown APRS coverage to name a few.

We will have all the risky stuff covered including cut-down systems to keep the balloons from going too far. Our best weapon is research. Knowing what the upper winds are doing is key to having the best chance of keeping the balloon in the country. We have a few resources to consider. Some we have already told you about.

I will be using the Jet Stream weather links for Europe:

http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/EU/2xJetStream.html

Another is the historic movement of the jet-stream – basically you can get a feel for what is coming

http://squall.sfsu.edu/scripts/nhemjetstream_model.html

Finally some prediction software from HABHUB – this set up for our project and Zagreb, but you can adjust for your own needs.:

http://predict.habhub.org/#!/uuid=ebb514c8730df4df256e57ea997cdd122c65a736

Records

I am now keeping records for the Jet Stream in Croatia each day (I missed yesterday). This will show us the main issues with the winds and how they flow. We have already found major differences between Australia and Croatia with total reverses in the Jet Stream over long periods. Australia seems far more consistent, but Croatia is closer to the northern boundary of the system that determines the winds, compared to where I launch from in Australia.  Here in Australia we are further away from one of the jet Stream boundaries. I will post more on that soon.

Here are the records for three of the last four days. I will have a month of records to get to know the way this all works.

20140311 Jet Stream  20140311 HABHUB prediction - 30km

 

20140312 Jet Stream  20140312 HABHUB prediction - 30km

 

20140314 Jet Stream  20140314 HABHUB prediction - 30km

 

The Z shape is common the many flights with the change in wind direction as the balloon rises from the Jet STream to the Stratospheric wind. Once the balloon bursts, the payload goes back through the same winds and the same eind directions get duplicated. It comes down faster, so the tail is a little shorter.

The prediction of the 4th day is a very good on for an easy recovery. It stays well in Croatia and away from the mines and can be launched from Zagreb. Simply we would not launch from Zagreb as we have little control of range. I only use Zagreb as a reference to see where the balloon will end up and the conditions that control the wind directions.

Balloon Launches in a New Country can be a real problem – even across a big country. Take care and research things well.

Stellar Stratospheric Balloon HAB Workshops

Bojan Markičević and workshopsBalloon HAB Workshops Scheduled in Croatia

What does it take to ensure that a major project like Stellar’s Stratospheric Balloon project works? Simply, lots of work by lots of people.

In recent days we have been examining the payload weights and requirements. Each experiment is allowed 150g or mass on board the balloons. None the less some have dangerous aspects such as fluids or heat generation. We have to ensure that their placement within our payload containment allows them to have the right “view”, air flow or whatever they require.  We rely on strong equipment descriptions and we have provided a wealth of information about designing and building payload containers, etc.

None the less, the contestants in what is effectively a competition have never done this before and simply, they need more assistance. To meet these needs we have assembled a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and our response. Stellar member Bojan Markičević will be traveling around Croatia and providing workshops for the various teams. The workshops have already commenced. The FAQ is below.

Download (PDF, 256KB)

Want to know more about this Stellar event?

http://teamstellar.org/#news-19

Here are the details for our Balloon HAB Workshops – courtesy of Google translate:

Schedule creative Balloon HAB Workshops

Dear teams ,

Below is the schedule and locations of scientific and creative Balloon HAB Workshops. Workshops carried Bojan Markičević a period of 4-5 hours .

Also we want to remind you to forward information ( if possible , in English ) related to your experiments ( weight , volume , special handling ) to 10/03/2014 .
Please enclose as much information about your experiments , so that our technical team ( Robert Brand , Tim Blaxland and Vilko Klein ) could plan a schedule of cargo .

Workshop schedule :

10.3 . ( M ) – Sisak , location : Technical School Sisak , time : 10:00 / / Teams : Stream instantly impulse , Gorilaz , SOLAR TEAM

11.3 . ( T ) – Kutina , location : technical schools Kutina , time : 09:30 / / Teams : GRAVITY , SPACE JET

13.3 . ( Thu ) – Zagreb , location : High school Luciano Laurana , Time : 11:00 / / Teams : ASTRONITHYUS , Suave , TIM HELIOS , CROSTRATOS
14.3 . ( Five ) – Zagreb , location : First Technical School , Time : 11:00 / / Teams : X – TESLA , FAUST TEAM

18.3 . ( T ) – Metkovic , location : High school Metkovic , Time : 15:00 / / Teams : BHIS PRISM SPECTRUM

19.3 . ( W ) – Zadar , location : Vocational School Vice Vlatković Time : 13:00 / / Team : EIGHTBIT

20.3 . ( Fri) – Rijeka , location : Elektorindustrijska and crafts school in Rijeka , time : 10:00 / / Teams : ELECTRIC DREAMS , gymnasium Pula ( Pula )
24.3 . ( M ) – Osijek , location : Electrical Engineering and Traffic School Osijek , time : 13:30 / / THE Renewables , DEA

25.3 . ( T ) – Daruvar Location: Technical School Daruvar , time : 11:00 / / CRANES , Bjelovar STELLAR LABARATORY ( Bjelovar )

See you soon !

UpLift-2

Jason (11 y/o) to Recover Balloons in Croatia

20130414 Jason Brand on the Fuzzy Logic Science ShowAustralian Student Recover Balloons in Croatia

Okay, I’ll be traveling with him to Croatia, but since there are two separate balloons to track and recover on two days, Jason will be well and truly tracking without my help and in a foreign country. He will have the team Stellar guys with him, but he will be doing the tracking and navigation for his vehicle. Stellar is a Team in the Google Lunar X Prize event. Have a look on Wiki to find out more.

jason is an 11 year old student in year 7 at Sydney Secondary College, Balmain Campus. At age 9 he obtained his Amateur Radio License (Foundation). We has some programing experience and builds and repairs helicopters and tricopters. He has helped track and recover 16 successful High Altitude Balloons and together Jason and I have the world’s highest recovery rate – 100% over an enormous number of missions.

A quick snapshot of the whole event:

We travel to Croatia at the start of the NSW school holidays. They are two weeks long. Jason and I will probably be traveling with fellow Team Stellar member Tim Blaxland. Tim is our team’s chief of UpLift-2Navigation. I look after the Team’s Communications, Tracking and Data. Jason is the Australian Student Representative and he is also my son.

Jason will be taking part in the planning phases of the mission and will have a big role in talking to the press and to school students. He will be bringing his newly built tricopter with him and he will be showing students what they can do with a little help. he will be talking about High Altitude Balloons (HAB) and the science of the troposphere and the stratosphere.

We will launch over two days and thus need to track 4 balloons – mostly with students experiments.  We have done our best to ensure success of Stellar’s “Balloon Stratosphere“.

Follow up interviews and more student mentoring and sessions.

Return to Sydney.

Much of this trip will be assisting the Croatian members of Team Stellar to get comfortable with HAB missions. Jason and I hope that we can pass on our expertise to the Croatian members.

Tim Blaxland already has some experience helping with a flight in NSW with us. That flight achieved nearly 37km altitude. We recovered the payload in a freshly cut wheat field a few weeks back.

More updates with travel and tracking information shortly. The picture below is Jason, Tim and I with some others preparing the recent balloon for flight. it is a 1.2kg balloon. Stellar’s balloons will be 3kg! That is the view from the payload camera.

DCIM100GOPRO

 

The Moon Landing and Educational Activities – Team Stellar

Educational Activities – Team Stellar

I was part of a Croatian press conference via Skype in December. It was an unusual feeling talking to an audience that you could not see or hear. The press conference was for Team Stellar and the upcoming balloon flight in Croatia. Jason and I are going to oversee the balloon flight and recovery of the payload.

This is from the Team Stellar blogsite. The original link is here:
http://www.googlelunarxprize.org/teams/stellar/blog/moon-landing-and-educational-activities

You really need to read this and other stories on the Team Stellar Blog:
http://www.googlelunarxprize.org/teams/stellar

Press conference 

This was a great month for space exploration . We all witnessed the Chinese Chang 3 having landed softly on the Moon, and Yutu (Jade Rabbit) rover is on its surface now. China has become the 3rd country in the world to put the robotic vehicle on the moon.

It is the first soft-landing on the moon by any spacecraft in 37 years. And it was especially interesting for us, all of the Google Lunar XPRIZE teams in the competition, because we are trying to do the same. There is only one small difference: we are doing it without the resources of the world economic superpower. Regardless, we strive to reduce the cost of the mission, we want to optimize each and every one of its segments, and that is our goal.

We want to get to the Moon as cheaply and as effectively as possible. We want to reduce all cost and make our technology commercially usable for the future.

Our COO Theo Valich giving interview for the television

Also, we held a press conference in Zagreb, Croatia to promote our educational outreach program, Balloon Stellar – Stratosphere. It was a great success. We want to spark interest of high school students in science and space exploration.  You can find out more on the subject on our webpage www.teamstellar.org ,or on our social media pages and channels.

Balloon Stellar – Stratosphere – Croatia

Balloon Stellar – Stratosphere to Launch in Croatia in April

Jason and I are headed to oversee the launch of this flight in Croatia. It will be in the NSW School Holidays.

This is from the Team Stellar blogsite. The original link is here:
http://www.googlelunarxprize.org/teams/stellar/blog/balloon-stellar-stratosphere

You really need to read this and other stories on the Team Stellar Blog:
http://www.googlelunarxprize.org/teams/stellar

Balloon Stellar – Stratosphere is our first serious educational program. That is why we have invested so much enthusiasm in its development. After a few months of preparations, uncountable work hours, eight creative workshops with over 130 participants, and many miles on the road, it finally starts. You can learn more about Balloon Stellar – Stratosphere competition here.

Group photo after the workshop in Metković, Croatia

Following the example of Google Lunar XPRIZE, we decided to offer a cash prizes to the most successful teams. We announced our competition everywhere and in every possible way.

We gave them an opportunity, and also the motivation.

We have prepared a special micro-site for the competition, we held a press conference, we were guests on TV on several occasions, and we were interviewed for the newspapers. Our social media pages and channels were constantly buzzing on the subject.

And now, all of our hopes have finally come true.  We have 21 teams in the competition! It is a great number of the teams, if you know that Croatia has the population of less than 4.5 mil. inhabitants.

We are more than happy with that number, but we are also very happy with the ideas for the experiments from high school teams.

You will hear more about the students’ experiments latter, but, in this post, I want to say something about creative workshops we have organized for the interested students.

The physicist Bojan Markičević, educational expert and communicator of science, was just the right person to conduct these workshops. Bojan has ten years of international experience in educational activities. He has a somewhat unconventional approach to knowledge transfer in relation to the classical education, especially in Croatia.

Bojan Markičević

Bojan traveled for over 2500 kilometers in just two weeks, in order to reach all of the teams (high school students) and encourage them to enter the competition.

He did not want to impose some ideas for the experiments or tell them what and how to do  them. The main goal of his creative workshops was to awaken their interest in science, and to prepare them for teamwork. Bojan has developed a series of activities for the 4-hour workshops which are interesting, refreshing and mind opening.

One of the activities during the creative workshop

He wants to include all of the participants in the conversation  to freely express their minds and to defend their opinions in a discussions, without any fear and reservations.

After the workshop, Bojan usually asks students to evaluate the workshop. They write their opinions about the workshop on the coloured papers, and stick them to the panel.

     

The high school students’ messages are clear, they find the workshops interesting, challenging, and they think that it helped them a lot to find a new perspective on the world around them. We are also hoping that Bojan`s workshops helped them learn the most important thing in science: how to ask the right question. When you learn how to formulate your question, only then you can conduct an experiment and find the right answer. Asking questions and finding answers, science is all about that.

Two days ago, we have published the names of the teams which entered the competition, and we wish all of them the best luck. Our balloons will fly the high school experiments this spring. Stay tuned.

Record Balloon (HAB) Attempt

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAustralian or International Record High Altitude Balloon (HAB) Attempt?

It seems that some HAB friends along with my son Jason and I are going to attempt a Balloon (HAB) record. It may be an Australian record or an International record. The only question remaining is how we will do the attempt. It is a serious question and looks like it will be either a self funded exercise or one of good timing. As many of you know, Jason and I assist with commercial launches through my company, PlusComms. Several customers in the very near future will be  making flights using zero pressure balloons. These are amazing balloons that do not burst like weather balloons. They simply are huge envelopes that expand to their maximum size and any excess gas vents from the bottom of the envelope. They often look under-filled when the are launched and then as they ascend and the gases expand, the balloon fills to capacity. Right: is a small Zero Pressure Balloon from Raven Industries in the US. Alternately we can use a 3kg weather balloon. The record may be altitude, distance or both.

So we have 2 options:

  • A 3Kg weather balloon
  • Hitching a ride on a Zero Pressure balloon

3Kg Weather Balloon.

UpLift-1 ready to launch with help from the locals at Rankins SpringsThese are the domain of amateur balloon enthusiasts. Smaller balloons are affordable as are parachutes and trackers. By the time you travel to a good launch site, the exercise may cost US$500. These balloons are like standard party balloons. They are sealed envelopes and they expand until they explode. That is UpLift-1; our first flight: pictured on the right. 3Kg is the weight of the balloon alone. UpLift-1 carried a 500 gram payload (1 pound) and the balloon and parachute cost me US$75

By under-filling a 3kg balloon for a slow rise and making the payload a simple tracker, we would expect over 40km altitude. By using Hydrogen, we would get a lot higher. The cost of the balloon alone with shipping is over US$500. Our attempt would cost close to US$900 when we factor petrol, balloon gas and accommodation. Possible maximum altitude would be close to 45km or nearly half the way to space (100km by most definitions). At some stage the balloon would explode and the flight would terminate. We would not recover the tracker unless it fell into a very accessible place. It would either explode or float without exploding. Either way the balloon would soon explode within 24 to 48 hours as the strong UV destroys the Latex material.

I buy my balloons from a UK seller:

Balloon Sales: http://randomengineering.co.uk/Random_Aerospace/Balloons.html

Zero Pressure Balloon

This is a serious high altitude balloon. A small one weighs nearly 20kg (41 pounds) and will reach 135,000 feet / 41km with a 7kg payload. One is pictured top right. What we are planning (if we get permission from one of the customers) is to cut away the paying payload and continue the flight with a smaller amateur payload designed to do two things:

  • Rise further without a payload to over 45km
  • Stay aloft for many days or weeks traveling around the world

2014-02-08--01-11-07-PSPI-8C9The secondary payload would have a communications package with a satellite modem to get back reports on the half hour and as requested. It will also be able to terminate the balloon envelope by command if required. During the night time, the balloon descends as the air cools. If the gas levels are low (leakage over time) it may descend into controlled airspace and it will need to be terminated. We will use solar power and rechargeable batteries and it will engage with local HAM radio operators with UHF RTTY capability and a frequency agile APRS transmitter. This is because there are different frequencies used for APRS in different countries. We may also have slow scan images from the balloon sent via RTTY packets. The images are broken up into 60 to 70 packets and sent with sequential RTTY transmissions. If sent back to the server, these are assembled back into an image. Any missing packets are left as grey or coloured bands. That is the example on the right with two missing packets. This was from a recent HAB flight conducted by my good friend Andy from Melbourne. Jason and I helped with both the launch and recovery.

With hydrogen, we may approach or exceed the 50kg mark and may exceed the maximum altitude of any object in the world other than rockets passing through the atmosphere.  The world record for HAB flights is 53km. We are now designing and building the equipment for flight. We are looking forward to flying with one or both of these missions.

As the customers may have unusual schedules or issues with secondary payloads, we may need to raise some funding through Kickstarter or similar to make this a reality. Minimum funding needed is US$15K.

 

 

Jet Stream Snapshot

Australian Jet StreamFind out what the Jet Stream is Doing.

If you are launching a High Altitude Balloon (HAB), it will be in the Jet Stream for a significant time during its flight. You had better know what the jet stream is doing. Predictions are good, but reality is the key. I have found a site that is perfect for this and the method of display is excellent.

Thanks to HAB enthusiast, Andy from Melbourne, for the link. In fact he launched a pico balloon flight (uses a foil balloon) that never got higher than 7,000m because he saw that the jet stream was running north from Melbourne. Before its transmitter battery failed or it ran out of range of the last tracking station it was nearing Bourke in NSW. Not bad for a foil balloon. That is nearly 1,000 kms. Below is a link to the Australian map for the jet stream.

The website is: http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/AU/2xJetStream.html

Below is the track of Andy’s Pico Balloon flight. There is a small chance that the battery is not flat and it may get picked up by a remote APRS station – HAM radio tracking station. If it gets seen again, we will let you know.

Andy Pico flight 20140217

You can clearly see from the Jet Stream map, that the flight was easily predicted visually.

Other countries will also have their Jet Stream maps – maybe on aviation websites. Search and you may be rewarded with a real tool. You will find many here:

Australia: http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/AU/2xJetStream.html

US: http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/US/2xJetStream.html

Europe: http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/EU/2xJetStream.html

Central America: http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/CA/2xJetStream.html

Southern America: http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/SA/2xJetStream.html

Asia: http://weather.wvec.com/auto/wvec/global/Region/AS/2xJetStream.html

Building a Tricopter

IMG_1883Jason Shows his Completed Tricopter – Phase 1.

As part of our work in both doing things in the space sector or our HAB (High Altitude Balloon) flights, we have always needed video from overhead. Building this tricopter is our way of achieving this. Tricopters are stable platforms for video cameras if built right.

This is Jason’s project. He is 11 years old and in Year 7. He has a vast knowledge on flight and also has a model aeroplane and a few small toy helicopters. This is nothing like that. This is a workhorse for our aerospace projects and to monitor details on the ground when we are preparing for a balloon flight or other project. Eventually we expect that we will be able to park the tricopter in the air and have it video the ground without movement in the sky and without anyone having to control it. We will also have point of view screens for the pilot radioing back the front image from an on-board camera. This will be overlaid with instrumentation to help guide the pilot.

If you would like to build such a craft, we will be having a full build video and information. One thing that surprised me was that the craft was very quiet. We can fly it in our yard without any complaints from neighbours.

Before we show you how to get involved, I will show a couple of videos so that you can judge for yourselves. The fully flying tricopter costs about US$300 and the controller and transmitter costs about US$50. Not a bad price for a workhorse like this. Please note that the basic unit does not have a camera. We have added a GoPro in the unit for testing, but we will be building a proper camera mount in later phases of this project. In fact the camera mount will have head tracking. You can look down, up, even left and right to some degree.

Below is our first test flight in our yard. It flew straight away. That was yesterday.

Today we have made it very stable and very manageable. It has been raining so little chance to refine the machine, but unit is looking great. Below is a bit today’s flights.

We will be taking this tricopter to Croatia to assist with Team Stellar’s balloon flights, taking students experiments into the stratosphere. We will have to have batteries shipped ahead of our arrival as we will not be allowed to transport these batteries with us.

 

Stellar Balloon Mission Gaining Momentum

UpLift-1 Securing the neck and the payloadStellar Balloon – Stratosphere

This is the background detail on the Team Stellar High Altitude Balloon mission that Jason and I are flying to Croatia to assist. The article below is from the Team Stellar website:

http://teamstellar.org/#news-19

Team Stellar is developing a project competition “STELLAR BALLOON – STRATOSPHERE”, open to teams from all interested high schools throughout Croatia.

Team Stellar will launch a science balloon into the stratosphere, about 30 km above the Earth’s surface, to collect data for the purposes of diverse student-designed experiments of the competition participants.

Through this innovative project, high-school students are given the opportunity to work with scientists and engineers from Team Stellar and experience an authentic flight mission from the start to the finish firsthand, while learning practical math, science and engineering skills, among others.

“STELLAR BALLOON – STRATOSPHERE” COMPETITION AIMS TO:

Stellar Balloon flight to the stratosphere in Croatia• stimulate the students’ interest in science and technology

• challenge their imaginative thinking and creativity

• support educational needs of gifted children

• encourage inter-institutional cooperation

• develop teamwork skills

• create a “healthy” environment and interest to improve the educational system and free-time activities

• raise awareness about the natural phenomena and ecological values of the planet Earth

CONDITIONS AND FUNDING:

There is no limit to the number of teams that can apply and every high school in Croatia can participate.

In order to join the competition, the applicants must submit an official proposal containing all the necessary documentation, including a clear description of the experiment, scientific objectives, technical plan, team organization, etc. A wide variety of topics may be pursued, including science and weather observations, remote sensing and image processing, engineering demonstrations, electronics, robotics and communications, etc.

Team Stellar and the committee members will select the first 20-50 candidates to participate in the balloon launch.

The selection will be made based on the originality of the idea and the quality of the student-designed experiments.

The schools are responsible for the funding of their teams’ experiments. Team Stellar will provide the necessary resources for the balloon [payload] design.

RESULTS:

Team Stellar will award the best three experiments.

Team Stellar will uplift the balloon [payload], track it, collect it upon landing, and return the payloads comprising of various experiments, planned by the students, to the participating teams for further analysis of the gathered data.

Each team is obligated to submit a final report, including the experiment description and the results, along with the entire work process within the team. All the participating high-school teams will have access to the complete results of the experiments.